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The CURA publications library is currently being digitized by the University of Minnesota Digital Conservancy. When the project is complete, the entire CURA publications library will be online and fully searchable. Unfortunately, during this process we are not able to honor individual requests for publications . Additionally, we no longer have physical copies of publications to send out.

New publications are digitized daily and the publications catalog on the CURA website is not automatically updated with links to scanned copies, so please search the CURA collection at the Digital Conservancy for the publications you are looking for:

Mental Health and the Gut Microbiome

Author: 
Mysz, Margaret

In recent decades, mental illness and its complications have been on the rise. Many view this increase in mental illness as a consequence of modernization. Specifically, economic changes, urbanization, dietary changes, sedentary lifestyles, lack of adequate sunlight, and decreases in social support are all believed to contribute to this increase. Although it is hard to pinpoint the exact cause of the increased prevalence of mental illness as it is most likely a combination of many factors, recent evidence has suggested that the gut microbiome plays a key role in the development and sustainability of mental disorders through multiple mechanisms. Additionally, dietary changes that specifically target and cultivate beneficial microbial populations in the gut may be an effective way to treat and prevent mental illness. This literature review explores the evidence linking the gut microbiome to brain diseases and how changing one’s diet may help mitigate symptoms of mental disorders.

Journal: 
KNCBR
Publication date: 
2017
Publisher: 
Unpublished
Sponsor: 
Conducted on behalf of Center for Victims of Torture. Supported by the Kris Nelson Community-Based Research Program, a program of the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA) at the University of Minnesota.
Pages: 
18
Online availability
CURA call number: 
KNCBR-1426