Jump to main navigation. Jump to main content

Evaluating the Contribution of the Built Environment to Extreme Warming During Twin Cities Metropolitan Area Heat Wave Events

Most cities in the United States are warming at twice the rate of outlying rural areas and the planet as a whole. While an individual heat wave event may be responsible for the majority of warming in an urban area at a given time, a phenomenon called the urban heat island effect may exacerbate the warming and play a role in additional heat-related mortality, an increase in tropospheric ozone, and economic losses that can total in the billions of dollars. Using data from a dense meteorological network of 200 temperature sensors across the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, this study will evaluate where and why particular regions warm the most with a focus on identification of at-risk populations. This project will include consultation with the Minnesota Department of Health, the cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, and the Metropolitan Council. Researcher: Peter K. Snyder (Department of Soil, Water, and Climate)

Project Award Date: 
2015-04-15
Community organization or agency: 
Minnesota Department of Health, the cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, and the Metropolitan Council
Sponsoring CURA Program: 
CURA Contact: 
Edward Goetz Director, CURA (612) 624-8737